Not sure where I saw the Supreme Lobster logo first – either on a spec request during my old Yellow Pages days, or on one of their many trucks that drive through the city. However, it was one of those logos that stuck in my head for many years. Fast forward to my current job in the western sububrbs, and one day during a hankering for some Jimmy John’s, I saw the original Supreme Lobster on North Avenue. I didn’t have much time, but I pulled my grocery getter into a parking lot and ran into a small store filled with lots of people and fish. There wasn’t enough time to even buy anything, and I knew I’d have to come back and take a closer look.

Supreme Lobster Grocery GalI didn’t intend it to take two years to return to Supreme Lobster, but it did. Before I drove out during my lunch break, I confirmed their address on their website. Good thing I did so, because I found out they had a new location and a 10% off coupon!

It was a few days before New Years, and I wanted to see what kind of specials they had for the holiday. When I found the new store, I was impressed by its large size, in addition to the fresh and modern interior.  It was bustling at noon with holiday shoppers stocking up for an eventful New Year’s Eve.

Supreme Lobster Grocery Gal StoreSupreme Lobster Grocery Gal Lobster TailThey had cute, tiny lobster tails for only $5.99 and larger ones from Maine, the Gulf Coast and South Africa. If you’re serious about your lobster, Supreme Lobster will have what you need. I’m no lobster connoisseur, but for $5.99 a tail, who wouldn’t leave without grabbing some of these appetizer sized beauties?

Supreme Lobster Grocery Gal Imported Lobster TailI’m personally more of a fan of crab legs than lobster, and Supreme Lobster helped me in that department, too. I could pick whichever King Crab legs I wanted for $19.99 a pound, but an even better deal was found in the tiny bags next to them.  They were 2 pound bags of bits and pieces of King Crab legs (but still as delicious) for around $25.

Supreme Lobster King Crab Grocery GalNot into shellfish? That’s ok. Supreme Lobster caters to restaurants, supermarkets, and food service operators beyond this retail store. What that mean to you is besides offering an incredible selection of lobster, Supreme Lobster’s has a fresh fish selection that is out of this world. If you can’t make it to places like Issacson & Stein, Hagen’s or Fresh Farms to buy fish, no sweat. Supreme Lobster will probably have what you’re looking for, and then some, all in a very inviting space. They also offer one stop shopping, as they sell craft beers and wines to pair with their products. Prosecco with oysters, anyone?

Supreme Lobster Grocery Gal WineSupreme Lobster Grocery Gal Fresh ShellfishSupreme Lobster Grocery Gal Fresh Seafood SaladThere was so much Supreme Lobster offered – I was like a kid in a candy store. The new location was so vibrant and exciting compared to the original storefront that I popped my head into a few years back. There’s a large frozen selection of Oriental Style breaded shrimp, along with other options like octopus, sepia and red snapper.

grocerygal-supreme-lobster-shrimpSupreme Lobster Frozen Fish Grocery GalReady for a crawfish boil? Maybe looking to add some Cajun spices to some fish? Or maybe you’re more into horseradish on some delicious smoked salmon? Whatever your taste buds prefer, Supreme Lobster has you covered. Supreme Lobster Cans Grocery GalSupreme Lobster Grocery Gal Smoked SalmonWant some Mahi Mahi? Chilean sea bass? Ahi tuna? No need to settle for whatever size filet is offered at other fish markets, they cut to order here.The prices are higher than what I’m used to spending (Mahi Mahi was $19.49/lb and the Sea Bass $39.99), but the quality is obviously second to none.

Supreme Lobster Fresh Fish Grocery GalThe store was very impressive. They are only open until 6 during the week, so plan accordingly. I’m sure they’re swamped on Saturdays, but it’s well worth it.

Supreme Lobster. 220 North Avenue, Villa Park, IL 60181. 630-834-3474. Monday 10am-6pm, Tuesday-Friday 9am-6pm, Saturday 9am-5pm. Closed Sunday.


If you live in Chicago there’s a pretty good chance you’ve seen Co-op Sauce – a locally made hot sauce that benefits Chicago youth – offered at many different restaurants. They offer a number of varieties including The Barrel, Green Mash-ine, Too Hot, and my favorite, probably the mildest in their bunch, Poblano. While you can buy their sauces at stores such as Gene’s Sausage Shop, Paulina Market and Whole Foods, I like to stop at Sauce and Bread Kitchen in Rogers Park to buy directly from the source.

SBK is a collaboration of Co-op Sauce and Crumb Chicago, and is located on Clark at Devon. They have a wonderful bakery and cafe, where each table features at least 6 varieties of Co-op’s hot sauces to try.

Grocery Gal Co-Op Hot Sauce SBKThis is the place to find all of Co-op’s sauce varieties, along with some locally sourced foods.

grocerygal-coop-miscWhen I go, I always pick up 2-3 bottles of the poblano sauce. They often have limited edition sauces that I think are only available at SBK.  Their hot sauces use real ingredients you can understand on the label – and they’re full of flavor, not just heat. These are also great gifts – I brought a bottle of their Rum Barrel Hot Sauce to a rum fanatic friend when I went to visit. It’s a nice, unique souvenir from Chicago.

Grocery Gal Co-Op Hot Sauce SBKGrocery Gal Co-Op Hot Sauce SBKI bet the Peppers in a Bottle sauce would go great with a Jibarito! That and the Poblano Mustard will be on my next to-buy list!

Grocery Gal Co-Op Hot Sauce SBKSBK partners with local farms to bring interesting flavors to their cafe menu, and also for sale such as Morel & Leek Jack cheese. So, if you’re in the Rogers Park neighborhood, stop in a SBK, grab a bite to eat, perhaps locally made pickled vegetables or whatever else they’re featuring in their market, along with a few bottles of Co-op’s Hot Sauce for you and a friend.

Sauce & Bread Kitchen. 6338 N Clark St, Chicago, IL 60660. 773-942-6384


I’ve found I have more grocery stores and food related things to write about than I have time for. That’s the basis for GGBite: bite sized reviews of places that I stopped in at, but might not have the time to do a full-on Grocery Gal posting on. Today’s first GGBite I came across on my bicycle one Saturday afternoon while running errands: Ameera Food, located next to Chicago Live Poultry on Western Avenue at Devon.

Grocery  Gal GG Bite Ameera Chicago Live Poultry

My Two Wheeled Austrian Grocery Getter – KTM City Bike

I was on my way to an appointment at Santhigram Wellness Kerala Ayurveda (you must try an Ayurvedic treatment  – it will change your life!) and was running a little early. As I was on Devon at Western, I looked north and saw Chicago Live Poultry. I was always a little scared of the store – but now as Grocery Gal, I knew I just had to go in.

Sorry, there aren’t any photos. As you can tell by the name, here’s where you can buy live chickens, along with other types of fowl: turkeys, pheasant, duck, goose. There was a hand-written sign on the wall listing what was available and at what price. I didn’t take a photo, as it was just such an uncomfortable place to be in; I had to go. The gist is you can choose your animal and it will be slaughtered and cleaned there for you. You can’t get any fresher than that, but it’s not for those with a weak stomach.

Next to Chicago Live Poultry was the the bright, clean Ameera Food. There were no windows to look in, but fresh posters touting “Fresh Fish” and “Meat.” Inside, it looked as if they’d be open only a few weeks – the place was well stocked with African, Caribbean, Middle Eastern and South Asian foods.

Can't get any fresherThey had a pretty large fresh fish selection with many of the staples: tilapia, catfish, but a few other fish I had never heard of. All were tucked in with lots of ice to keep them fresh. What was most interesting was the aquarium where you could purchase live tilapia.

They also offered the services of Chicago Live Poultry without the full experience. You could tell the butcher counter you’d like a chicken, and they would take care of the rest. They had a small, but fresh butcher case with Zabiha Halal meats as well.

Grocery Gal Ameera Food Western ChicagoThey carried a lot of African products including Red African Beans, Oporo and dried Crawfish. There was a good selection of grains that I haven’t cooked with before: Elubo/Amala and Yellow Gari. As I’m currently eating gluten free, I bought some Fufu flour which is used to make a West African style dumpling. Yellow Gari Ameera Nigerian Grain Chicago Grocery GalFufu flour African Ameera Chicago Grocery GalThere was a small produce section. I think there are other options on Devon, like Fresh Farms, that are better options to by produce from. However, specialized ones like Ghana Yams are worth a purchase at Ameera.

Ghana Yams African Produce Chicago Grocery Gal AmeeraA frozen selection focused more on Asian specialties including Durian, which I have never seen outside of Thailand, and Cassava and Jute leaves from the Philippines.Durian Fruit Chicago Ameera Grocery Gal

Cassava Leaves Jute Leaves Chicago Ameera Grocery GalEntering Ameera was an adventure for me. While I didn’t exactly know how to cook much of the food they sold, I knew it’s a great resource to share on Grocery Gal. And next time I cook a whole chicken, I might stop in to get a freshly slaughtered on from Ameera. I’ll admit, it’s a little easier to digest when you don’t have to see the what happens behind the curtain.

Grocery Gal Ameera Food

Ameera Food. 6410 N. Western Ave, Chicago, IL 60645. 773-338-8400.  Chicago Live Poultry. 6421 N. Western Ave. Chicago, IL 60645. 773-381-1000.


My first introduction to Coop grocery store was during college with the Neighborhood Co-op, located in Carbondale, Illinois. It was on the north side of town, in one of the more historical buildings, next to Longbranch Coffee House. It was a small shop filled with long-time residents (read: hippies, but in a good way) of Southern Illinois, where I could find vegetarian food and bulk dried goods. I spent a semester documenting the store for one of my photography classes.

After graduating I had gone back to eating meat (well, both my parents were from Europe…), and knew where to find quality food throughout Chicagoland, so my interest in co-ops faded away. Fast forward twenty years, and I came across an article on Chicago Market, a co-op in the organizing and start up phase to be located on the north side of the city. They were having an informative meeting the next day in my old stomping grounds of Sheridan Park.

Grocery Gal Chicago Market Coop Meeting

Saturday morning in Chase Park

Being a Saturday and coming from Jefferson Park, I knew I could get there faster on my bike than my grocery getter. I’m going to a meeting about a co-op, how dare I drive there!  I showed up at the Park District (albeit a little sweaty) to a group of about 15 interested people learning more about the concept of Chicago Market. Do co-ops make you think of granola, hippies, patchoulli and bulk foods? Well, that’s not the image of Chicago Market. Their nice, clean logo, well designed website and collateral material pulled on my graphic heart strings and screamed modern and urban, but by no means hipster.

Grocery Gal Chicago Market Logo

Gotta love good design

The brains behind the co-op, Greg Berlowitz, along with 5 or so members of their Steering Committee, told us more about their vision. They answered some really frank questions: What makes you think you’ll succeed? (My answer: they’re organized and passionate) If you don’t make your goal will we get our money back? (Their answer: Yes, after any startup loans have been paid off). They have addressed the ten most common questions on their website, so I won’t repeat them all here.

These people have their shit together; and while that might read as funny, it’s nothing but accolades. They’re organized, professional and passionate about making Chicago Market successful. They want to build community, small businesses and a sustainable way of life. I envisioned myself taking my stepson (or a bunch of girlfriends) to a cooking class hosted by a Chef Moya. I could see my friends at Molter Family Orchards selling their delicious organic produce at the store. I could share my suggestions on carrying some of the amazing (and affordable) homemade sausages from local stores like Montrose Deli and Amish Farmers, which not only exposes more people to their great products, but also builds these local businesses.

That’s why I signed up that Saturday to be a member (I’m number 206). It wasn’t something I planned to do. I didn’t have a spare $250 just lying around, but I knew this was something I wanted to be a part of. Since the meeting, they’ve offered a more palatable payment plan, where you can spread the cost over ten months. Help Chicago Market reach their goal of getting 1000 members in 100 days by joining up now. Even if you’re not ready to commit, sign up for their newsletter and follow them on Facebook to see when their next informative meeting works with your schedule.

Chicago Market – A Community Co-op.


As I’ve written before, I love to host and cook for friends. We had an impromptu brunch with a friend who was visiting Chicago for the weekend. It was last minute, so I had to come up with whatever I had in the house.

Grocery Gal La Criolla

Spanish tortilla adapted from La Criolla’s recipe

We had enough potatoes and eggs to whip up our go-to brunch recipe: Spanish Tortilla. My husband follows an authentic recipe from friends in Barcelona, and I’ve been adapting mine from a spice-filled recipe from La Criolla’s website. While his thinks it’s tortilla blasphemy to add garlic and spices, I love it. So we created a scenario that was the best of both worlds: my husband’s authentic one, my spice filled one, and our friend could try both. I had gotten some garlic tops from Amish Farmers the previous Friday and I added those to my tortilla. I even cut the potatoes two different ways so there was not questioning which tortilla was which.

Grocery Gal LaCriolla spice

Her and His spanish tortilla components

Along with two types of Spanish tortilla we also had manchego cheese, a staple in the Grocery Gal household. Unfortunately we were out of Cava (my stash from Vin Chicago had been exhausted), so we couldn’t make our standard brunch drink of Cava with apricot nectar. It seemed as good of a time as any to continue our Spanish theme and open up a box of Beso del Sol Sangria. Sangria for brunch? Why not!

Beso del Sol Grocery gal Caputo's

Beso Del Sol Sangria – 3 liters in one handy box

I am usually skeptical of premixed drinks. I found Beso Del Sol at Caputo’s, and after reading that it was imported from Spain, I thought I’d give it a try. My original intentions were to bring the sangria to a barbecue I was going to later that day, but with 3 liters hidden in one handy box, I thought it was ok to test out a few glasses in advance.

We drank the sangria straight, with no fruit. The only reason the drink was sans fruit was I couldn’t  remember what type of fruits to put in the drink. Apples, yes… but I’d have to go downstairs and get some out of the fridge. Oranges, oh yeah! But I didn’t have any in the house. Had they recommended fruits to add on the box, I would’ve bought them when I bought the sangria. Fortunately the sangria was perfect on it’s own – it didn’t need any fruits.

What I loved about it was it wasn’t too sweet. It had a slight sweetness to it, but nothing so sweet that you couldn’t drink more than one glass.

So round one of entertaining with Beso Del Sol’s sangria was a success. How would it be a few hours later at a summer barbecue? I’d have to wait and see.

There were beverages a plenty at the barbecue, but I seemed to be the only one enjoying the sangria. It had cute, bright packaging – but no takers. Was it the boxed wine stigma? Perhaps. Had I transferred it from a box to a pitcher filled with fruits, it might’ve sparked more interest. It wasn’t until the hostess brought the box and some glasses to a table of friends that everyone tried the Beso Del Sol, and subsequently fell in love with it, too. They agreed with me – it wasn’t too sweet and was refreshing on a warm summer day. They couldn’t believe that tiny box held 3 liters of tasty goodness, and was only $19! Fortunately, all my friends have an outpost of Caputo’s near their homes or work, and I’m pretty confident they’ll be picking up a box or two real soon: one for brunch and one for their next barbecue!

Beso Del Sol Sangria. I bought mine at Angelo Caputo’s in Elmwood Park.

 


I’ve written about the pleasant aromas in many of the delis I’ve stopped in at. Each time I stop in at Danny’s Old World Market, I’m also hit with an aroma, but not always the most pleasant. It’s not bad; it’s just a combination of the variety of spices which can be off-putting to some. However, I don’t let that ever discourage me; I’ve been coming here for at least ten years.

Grocery Gal Old World Market Uptown Jamaican

Free parking available

Old World Market is in an nondescript strip mall on Broadway, north of Asia on Argyle and south of Foster. They specialize in African, Jamaican and Caribbean foods and has been my go-to spot for years for Jerk seasoning and Ting grapefruit soda. Yeah, now I can find some of those items at Fresh Farms and Pete’s Fresh Market, but if you live by the lake, I highly recommend stopping in, getting some jerk seasoning and chicken legs and prepare yourself for a great barbecue treat.

Grocery Gal Old World Market Uptown Jamaican

So many choices; choose any “hot” one and you’ll be happy

There are a lot of items at Old World Market that I don’t know how to cook with: which are namely palm oil, dried fish and goat. I love Jamaican style curried goat – when I’m ready to make it one day (hard when living with a vegetarian), I’ll definitely stop here to get the meat.

Grocery Gal Jamaican Old World Market

Dried Fish at Old World Market

Grocery Gal Jamaican Old World Market

I love curried goat. When I will make it one day, I’ll come here to get it

Jamaican style sodas Grocery Gal Old World Uptown

Jamaican style sodas

My purchases at Old World are limited: the aforementioned jerk seasoning and maybe a Ting to go. With a handful of Caribbean recipes in my purse, I feel I could have a more well-rounded experience at Old World market. I might just have to start searching that curried goat recipe….

Grocery Gal Old World Market Jamaican Uptown

Who needs some habaneros?

Danny’s Old World Market. 5129 N Broadway St #1, Chicago, IL 60640. 773-989-4440. Open 7am-10pm. Closed at 8pm on Sundays.


Over the past few years, local farmers markets have begun to gain momentum throughout Chicago. There are neighborhood and independent markets in many communities. Last Sunday I visited a new addition to Chicago’s Northwest Side – the Belmont-Cragin Farmer’s Market. I first found out about the market on Everyblock with it’s well-designed poster catching my eye.

Grocery Gal Belmont Cragin Market

A well designed flyer will always catch my eye

The market is ambitiously held every Sunday. It’s not far from the neighboring Portage Park farmers market which seems to interchange it’s weekends with the Jefferson Park Sunday Market. Do we really need another Farmer’s Market? With one like Belmont-Cragin, my vote is yes!

Belmont Cragin Farmer's Market Grocery Gal

Despite it being in a parking lot, it’s a great market

The market is located in the Belmont-Cragin Business District, directly on Belmont, east of Central Avenue (right by A&G Fresh Market) in a PNC parking lot. While it’s not the most glamorous location, it will hopefully gain many new customers from the Belmont traffic. It’s slightly west of the original Gene’s sausage shop.

What I liked about the market was it’s European Market flavor, featuring sustainable and artisan goods including jam, pastries, granola and cheeses, in addition to produce. As the growing season progresses, there will be more produce available, but on the second week there was still fresh asparagus, a variety of herbs and tons of gorgeous flowers for sale. Every vendor there had a purpose. There weren’t any corporate sponsors – like Directv or Xfinity – who were at the Portage Park Farmer’s Market that same Sunday.

Grocery Gal Belmont Cragin Farmer's Market

Herbs, vegetables and lots of beautiful flowers

I bought a delicious chocolate croissant from St. Roger Abby and the most incredible Pain de Sophia from Katic Breads. Where I’ve been reluctant in the past to buy a $6 loaf of bread from Eataly, I cannot wait until this Sunday to try another loaf of their amazing bread. The Pain de Sophia was recommended to me by Michael from Brightflower Farm, and he was spot on. The complex flavors of anise, cumin and fennel interspersed in organic wheat flour are addicting. I’ve had two slices of the bread for breakfast everyday this week with just a touch of butter. If you’re living gluten-free, there were tons of sweets from D-ology, too.

grocerygal-belmont-farmers-6I’m not traditionally a granola person, but Spice Roads Granola sucked me in with their sweet curry walnut granola. I eat it with plain yogurt and love it.

Grocery Gal Belmont Cragin Farmer's Market

Pain de Sophia and Spice Road Granola!

As a new market, Belmont-Cragin will need a steady stream of customers to stay successful; it doesn’t have the deep pockets that other markets have for advertising. However, they keep it real and aren’t bringing in the corporate sponsors the same said markets are. This is a Farmer’s Market – I’m not looking to choose a satellite provider! Keeping their focus on local, sustainable and artisan goods supports local  businesses along with giving residents something special in their own back yard. And, many of the vendors have great samples, too! Even if you’re not near the Belmont-Cragin neighborhood, take the time to visit them some Sunday. There’s something special happening here, and Grocery Gal wishes them a lot of success!

Grocery Gal Belmont Cragin Farmer's Market

The hand painted sign gives it a definite European feel

Belmont-Cragin Farmer’s Market. 5446 West Belmont Ave…rain or shine. Every Sunday 10am-2pm until October 26th.


Mother’s Day is coming up. This will be my 11th Mother’s Day without my mom, but I still think of her every day. She would love to go downtown with me and window shop on the Magnificent Mile. If she was still here today, I know we’d want to spend part of Mother’s Day eating some great food and enjoying wine at Eataly.

Grocery Gal Eataly Chicago

Welcome to food heaven

Eataly opened in Chicago around Thanksgiving. Friends messaged me, asking if I wanted to see it with them. An entire mega-store food-court filled with imported Italian foods and wines? A Dean and Deluca on steroids? Two floors of food goodness that took over an EPSN Zone? I’m in!

I first went on a Saturday at 6pm a few weeks after it opened. It was total chaos! I thought Fresh Farms on a Saturday was insane; it was nothing compared to Eataly’s crowds. I tried to forget the crowds and focus on what was in front of me: rows and rows of pasta, wines, cheeses, jellies, fresh bread, fresh meat, fresh truffles, freshly made mozzarella??? It’s a culinary overload and I didn’t really know where to go first.

I’ll be blunt. Eataly is expensive. They have two locations in the US, some in Japan, Istanbul, Dubai and a handful in Italy. When Japan and Dubai are in the mix, you know you’re not going to have bargain basement prices.  Amazing fresh bread that was… $6 a loaf? I’ll pass. However, I did find a nice 4 pack of jams for $9 that go with cheese and crackers that I’ll likely purchase somewhere else (like Caputo‘s).

The everyday food, including fresh fish counter, are really for those high rollers who don’t flinch when they see a sushi grade tuna for $29/lb. I wanted to pass out Grocery Gal cards telling passers by they could get the same exact quality of tuna at Fresh Farms for literally half that price. Farmed raised salmon for $15??? Pfft. Fresh Farms offers two types of wild salmon lower than that price. too.

Grocery Gal Eataly Chicago

Nice looking, but overpriced, fresh fish

So, why am I writing about Eataly if I’m dissing on the prices? Eataly is more about the experience than a place to buy groceries at. This is the place I want to meet my friends at, grab a table, some wine and a plate of snacks. I’ll recommend anyone visiting the city to stop in for a drink. It is chaotic, but it’s brilliant at the same time. The second time I stopped in at Eataly was at 4pm on a Thursday. It was like the quiet before the storm, and it was perfect.

Grocery Gal Eataly Chicago

If I still worked downtown I’d be bellying up to one of these every week.

If I was in Italy, I would’ve sat at the bar alone, had a nice afternoon Prosecco and maybe a small cheese plate. Instead, I wanted to get home to my family, so I grabbed a few slices of focaccia to go. They wrapped up the slices in paper just like in Italy. In the seven plus times I’ve visited the country, I’ve never had focaccia better than what I had at Chicago’s Eataly. The bread/crust had a bite to it that was like nothing I’ve ever had before. They bake all their bread onsite in brick ovens; if their $6 loaf of bread tasted this good, then it was probably worth it. A slice of marghertia and squash/ricotta focaccia set me back $6, and was totally worth every penny.

Grocery Gal Focaccia eataly chicago

Grab multiple flavors of focaccia to go

You can easily get lost inside Eataly. The place is so huge they offer maps when you walk in. On that quiet Thursday afternoon I stumbled upon areas that I never even knew existed: the meat take-away, preserved condiments and tomatoes & sauces. I knew those areas would just take me to the financial dark side, so I slowly exited the area until I found myself at the Salumi & Formaggi station.

grocery gal blog eataly chicago

food porn eataly style

I think I sighed out loud when first saw the cheese counter with the various smoked meats dangling from the ceiling. I knew my mom would’ve loved this. Combined, we would’ve spent too much money, consumed too many calories and laughed about it all over glasses of Valpolicella. Since we were in Eataly, I could convince her to forgo her usual (insert hand rub) Chardonnay. What a great way to spend a Mother’s Day, right?

I miss my mom dearly, but I think about whenever I’m searching for delicious, interesting food at the best price possible. Her influence is what made me Grocery Gal. And it’s not all about the good deal; it’s also about enjoying life with my loved ones. Happy Mother’s Day to all the moms out there!

Eataly Chicago Market. 43 E Ohio St, Chicago, IL 60611. 312-521-8700. Open 7 days 10am-11pm. You can sneak in at 8am for coffee.


I have to apologize for the influx of Lincoln Square posts recently. The neighborhood is filled with some really good gems, which explains why, despite the stroller influx, it still holds a warm place in my heart. Today’s installment is where I find myself shopping for loose-leaf tea. Yes, there are some pretty extensive boutique tea shops in the Chicagoland area, but when I want tea, I head on over to Julius Meinl in Lincoln Square. In February I stopped by before my Chef Martin sausage making class and was disappointed to see them closed at 6pm. Hopefully those were just winter hours and they’ll be open later now that spring is here.

Grocery Gal Julius Meinl Lincoln Square

At the corner of Lincoln and Montrose. Unfortunately they close at 3pm weekdays.

What makes Meinl so special? Well, being half Austrian is one reason, and another parlays off of studying abroad in Vienna during college. The Julius Meinl am Graben is a foodie’s paradise alongside places like Zum Schwarzen Kameel and Trzesniewski. They are all in walking distance from the place I will forever stay at: Pension Nosek. Whoops, sorry for the travelosity digression. Long story short, when Meinl came to Chicago in 2002 I became a loyal, but infrequent, customer. I’m not a huge coffee person, so when I stop in it’s often for a special occasion.

grocerygal-meinl-coffeeMy drink of choice at Meinl is a melange; a Viennese coffee drink which is something between a cappuccino and a latte. They sprinkle some cocoa on top as a final touch. It’s not the same experience when ordering it to go. When I do order one, I try to sit down at a table for the full Viennese experience which includes a glass of water and ginger cookie on top of a silver tray. Unfortunately, there wasn’t any time to sit down this visit.

Meinl offers a nice variety of coffees, teas and jams. I don’t buy the coffee, only because I can’t replicate the melange experience at home. What I do stock up on are the teas, which come in a variety of flavors, running in a $3-$6 price point. My two favorites are the Silver Cloud white tea and the Vanilla Rooibos. The rooibos has a decadent dessert-like flavor and is naturally zero calories – just perfect.

Julius Meinl Grocery Gal tea

The color of the Meinl boy explains the type of tea it is: fruit, rooibos, white tea, black tea

You’re probably wondering, so what, it’s tea, I can get that anywhere, right? Well, not quite. While I didn’t have time to sit and enjoy a melange, I did take a peek at what makes Meinl a favorite for my father and so many others: the dessert case. Meinl does one of the best jobs for creating authentic Viennese pastries in Chicago. Growing up, my family helped to keep the Vienna Pastry Shop on Addison and Long in business. When they closed down years ago, we struggled to find something comparable. People tried to turn us on to Oak Mill Bakery, but it wasn’t the same. While very pricey, the Meinl Patisserie makes wonderful pastries, perfect for pairing with a melange, cappuccino, pot of tea or even a regular ole coffee. If you are looking to feed a larger group, Cafe Vienna in Lincoln Park also makes great Viennese-style pastries at a lower price point. I’ve only had Cafe Vienna’s pastries; I have yet to try their melange. If money is not an object, you can enjoy Meinl’s pastries in full size cake sizes, too.

Julius Meinl Pastries Lincoln Square Grocery Gal

More than just strudel…

If you don’t have a huge sweet tooth, their granola is also a good option. It’s available in bags and in to-go parfaits for breakfast.

grocerygal-meinl-granolaI highly recommend buying your tea, coffee, jam or granola as an entire Julius Meinl experience. Whether that is simply a melange or pot of tea on its own, paired with a delicious pastry, or part of a full meal during brunch or lunch (their menu is spectacular), you’ll be pleasantly surprised. And hopefully you’ll see why I buy all my loose-leaf teas here. In addition to Lincoln Square, they have one at location at Southport and Addison; it’s their original coffeehouse.  A downtown location perfect for tourists should be opening soon at 211 E. Ontario. I know I’ll be recommending my out-of-town guests to stop in as they’re hanging out on the Magnificent Mile. Hmm, that’s a short walk from Eataly. I wonder if Meinl plans to take it up a notch and have more food for sale like their Vienna flagship Meinl Am Graben? I can’t wait to find out!

Julius Meinl on Lincoln. 4363 N Lincoln Ave, Chicago, IL 60618. 773-868-1876. Open 7 days, but call for hours.


Wow, where there’s so much crossover in this and a few upcoming Grocery Gal installments, I was struggling on which topic to write about first. As you know, my European roots make me fond of meats of the smoked variety. Other than that, I’m not a big meat eater. It’s rare that I head over to an actual butcher, but I was planning on making my own sausages and needed to get some casings. I was told I could find them at Paulina Market.

Now that I live west of the Kennedy, I don’t make it to Lakeview often. I’m also not someone who traditionally buys steaks or large amounts of meat, because my husband is a vegetarian. If I did, though, I’d definitely go out of my way and visit Paulina Market for my special occasion meats. This isn’t a store where you’ll get some ground beef for tacos or poultry for beer can chicken. This is the place you go to when you want a special cut of meat, or something exotic. Forget Whole Foods; go support a Chicago staple since 1949.

Grocery Gal Paulina Meat Market Chicago

Don’t be fooled by the 80’s brick facade.

Paulina Meat market’s entrance is on Lincoln Avenue. They have a few parking spaces behind the store, which is great when you’re sick of shelling out $1 for 30 minutes of street parking like I am. The 80’s brick facade doesn’t prepare you for what you’ll experience on the inside. Even if you don’t know what you want, start out by grabbing a number when you walk in.

Grocery Gal Paulina Meat market chicago lakeview

Take a number!

Grocery Gal shops at Lakeview's Paulina Meat Market

Not sure if there’s anywhere in Chicagoland that can top this

Grocery Gal Paulina Market Chicago

a true butcher shop

Grocery Gal Paulina Market Chicago

Rabbit, Wild Boar, Pheasant, Poussin, Squab and Duck

Huge meat cases flank half of the store: fresh meat, fresh sausages and smoked meats. More exotic meats, game and fowl are in freezer cases which divide the store into quadrants. If you’re a breakfast person, grab a frozen pack of their Corned Beef Hash. Don’t worry about the $7 price tag – this is worth it! They’ve expanded their offering in 2007 and there just seems to be anything and everything you’d ever need related to meat.

The butchers (I think they’re all men), know their stuff and are ready to recommend anything you ask them about. What type of meat should I use for jerky? Eye of round recommended for at home, but would I like to try a sample of theirs which uses sirloin? Why yes, yes I would.

Grocery Gal shops at Paulina Meat Market in Chicago's Lakeview neighborhood

Paulina Market’s beef jerky sliced to order – super tender and not tough

What also makes Paulina Meat Market absolutely amazing for cooks is the breadth of their offering. I found out from Chef Martin at my DANK Haus sausage making class that Paulina Meat Market would carry natural casings to make your own sausage. When a woman working there showed me where to find it, I came across rendered duck fat, pork lard, pork crackling, who knew it was different than pork lard, and goose lard. So, if I made my own sausages and then cooked some fries in duck fat, I could create my own take on Hot Dougs!

Grocery Gal shops at Paulina Meat Market in Chicago's Lakeview neighborhood

Rendered Duck Fat, Pork Lard, Pork Crackling, Goose Lard and plain ole butter

While I did pick up the Nature’s Best casings, a company based out of Chicago, I passed on getting the pork shoulder at this time. I knew I could find it cheaper somewhere else. Being so close to Wrigley Field, Paulina Market created some “Beat the Curse” Goat Brats, and I picked up one to grill at home. I highly recommend it whether you like the Cubs or not!

Grocery Gal Paulina Market Chicago

Fresh made brats, including the Cub Fan Favorite – Goat Brats. It was amazing!

Grocery Gal Paulina Meat Market Chicago Lakeview

Who doesn’t love the Sausage Font?

If fresh meat isn’t your thing, they have other options, too. Frozen meals, cheese, fresh bread, and a limited produce section which is more for the items you forgot to pick up at another store. Lots of fancy European snacks and spreads, with a particular nod to Germany. There’s a great selection of sauces and condiments, and Paulina Market does a nice job providing local brands.

Grocery Gal Smoke Daddy Lille's Q BBQ Sauce Chicago Paulina Market

Get sauced at Paulina Meat Market – including local Chicago brands

Overall, Paulina Market is so much more than a butcher shop. If you’re a chef that is cooking a special meal, head on over. If you don’t like to cook but want some comfort food, you can easily stock your freezer with their stuff. Have a question about meat? Not sure if anyone else can better answer your questions than these people. This is a great stop for out of towners with all the vacuum packed and frozen options; it’s easy to take stuff home. And on top of it all, everyone at Paulina Market seems to just love what they do. In true European style, they have limited hours, so make sure you get there on a Saturday if you don’t live nearby.

Grocery Gal Paulina Meat Market Chicago

Beyond the traditional smoked meat fare: goose, tasso, pork loin and turkey

Paulina Market. 3501 N. Lincoln Avenue (corner of Lincoln & Cornelia) Chicago, IL 60657. 773-248-6272. Mon-Friday 9am-6pm, open till 7pm on Thursdays. Saturday 9-5. Closed Sunday.