It’s 6:45am on a Saturday, and I’m driving on the Kennedy heading to Lincoln Park. Why am I doing this? I wake up Monday-Friday at 5:30 and this is the one day I can really sleep in… it’s not even 7 and I’m already in a car driving 60 mph on the expressway?

I’m on my way to Lincoln Park’s Green City Market to meet up with Efren Candelaria and Chef Gabriel Moya, two of the four partners behind Sobremesa Supper Club. The other two, Felipe Cabrera and Mayra Estrella, Efren’s wife, were busy with their own to-do lists for the next night’s dinner. I had strict orders to meet Efren and Chef Moya at 7:15am while they would be shopping for fresh, locally grown, sustainable produce which are the cornerstone of their amazing Sunday dinner events. If you haven’t heard of Sobremesa yet, shame on you! Chef Gabriel Moya has already been identified as one of Chicago’s “finest up-and-coming ‘underground’ chefs” by the Huffington Post. Their mission statement sums it up: they’re a Latin inspired, locally sourced dining experience that looks to foster community through food, relationships, and dialogue. The only thing that’s missing in their mission statement is how incredible the food tastes!

The Green City Market is easily Chicago’s go-to place for locally sourced food. From May to October they’re on Clark Street at Lincoln on Wednesdays and Saturdays, and from November to April in the Peggy Notebart Museum on Saturdays only. Chicago doesn’t offer a seven day traditional free standing market like my favorites La Boqueria Market in Barcelona or the Naschmarkt in Vienna do. The Green City Market started in 1998 and grew to Chicago’s premier Farmer’s Market, with the closest rival being the City of Chicago’s Daley Plaza Farmer’s Market.

Grocery Gal Green City Farmer's Market Chicago

The Quiet before the Storm at (what I think is) Chicago’s largest Farmer’s Market

And because the Green City Market is one of Chicago’s favorite markets, I had to meet bright and early at 7:15am. There are a ton of benefits to arriving early at the market: parking meters didn’t go into effect until 8am, the market was extremely manageable to walk through, the people at this hour were serious about shopping, and I could easily see Efren’s bright yellow Colombia soccer jersey as I walked over to meet them.

Grocery Gal Sobremesa Green City Market

There’s Efren in the middle of the photo

When I caught up with them (on time, too!), Chef Moya reminded me of myself as Grocery Gal: he was focused man on a mission; just let him go shop and stay out of his way while you just step back and take it all in. Shopping is just part of the long process; after you leave, and get to work on the prep. The Sobremesa chef has an idea what he’ll cook for their Sunday night dinners based knowing what produce is in season, but he refines his menu here based on what looks good at the market. It’s really amazing.

Sobremesa Supper Club Grocery Gal Green City Market

Looks like this will be on Chef Moya’s menu tomorrow

Chef Moya Sobremesa Grocery Gal Green City Market

Stocking up on more organic scallions from King’s Hill Farm

I really enjoyed watching Chef Moya purchase produce from a variety of farmers. Sobremesa supports the community of farmers at the market, not just one vendor. It follows Sobremesa’s theme of fostering community through food and relationships. The bulk of the ingredients used in their dishes are sourced from the Green City Market, and many of the vendors know Chef Moya well. What really stuck with me was the chef was the one choosing what he was purchasing; it wasn’t just placing an order and getting something delivered. It gave me a whole new appreciation of the care and thought that goes into each meal they create.

Grocery Gal Chef Moya Sobremesa Nichols Farm

Buying produce and talking World Cup with Nichols Farm

Yes, when it’s that early, you could get the best of what’s there to offer, and the throngs of people who enjoy the market a weekly social event had yet to arrive. But what I enjoyed the most was watching the dialog between the Sobremesa crew and the farmers.

A quick 30 minutes had gone by and both Chef Moya and Efren were saying their goodbyes. There was still a lot of prep work needing to be done for the next night’s dinner. As long as I was at the market and the crowds were still non-existent, I was going to do a little shopping myself. We said goodbyes and I couldn’t wait to see their creations tomorrow on Instagram.

The perimeter of the market focused on produce, while the interior parts were more artisan products including baked goods, jellies and honey, cheeses, meats and such. If you weren’t a cook, there were crepes and wood fired pizzas ready to order and eat there. There were a fair number of Wisconsin artisan food products, and one that caught my eye was Black Garlic North America: fermented black garlic that was super sweet and smelled incredible. I am aware of the many health benefits of eating fermented foods, so I picked up a clove. I headed back to my car by 7:56am, and I still had 4 more minutes before I’d have to feed a meter!

North America Black Garlic Grocery Gal Green City Market

Sweet and savory wrapped up in one: fermented black garlic.

So, the big question still is, what did Sobremesa end up buying, right? I was lucky enough to have them send me a picture of the day’s bounty. The rest of the images I grabbed from their Instagram feed.

Sobremesa Supper Club Chef Moya Grocery gal

Photo courtesy of Sobremesa Supper Club.

Diners at Sobremesa each get a hand written menu of their vegetable-forward meal. I’ve attended two of their events and have saved both menus because it’s just been such a wonderful experience. There’s so much love an passion in what they do it’s inspiring; and with their locally sourced vegetable focus reinforces community and thinking about where food comes from. They’re helping to support small business all while keeping a smaller environmental footprint.  Follow them on Facebook and get into one of their dinners as soon as you can.

Chef Moya Sobremesa Efren Art menu

It’s just perfect. Wish I had been there! Photo courtesy Sobremesa Supper Club

Sobremesa Supper Club Foodie Pilsen

The beautiful (and delicious) end result. Photo courtesy Sobremesa Supper Club.

Sobremesa Supper Club. Follow them on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter to find out about upcoming events.

Green City Market. Clark Street at Lincoln. Chicago, IL 60614 (773) 880-1266

 

 


I’ve been rather busy lately, which doesn’t give me much time to devote to my Grocery Gal fans. However, a package arrived yesterday and I just had to share it! I’ve gotten my first Food Dehydrator! I remember hearing about food dehydrators as a kid, but never thought of getting one… until I realized you can make your own beef jerky with it! Finally, I can be prepared for the zombie apocalypse! What really is great about the Nesco dehydrator is that it’s programmable. I’m hoping I can prepare everything either before I go to bed or to work in the morning.

Grocery Gal Nesco Food Dehydrator American Harvest Made in USA

Now I can prepare for the zombie apocalypse

The inspiration to make my own jerky came after I had visited Paulina Meat Market for the first time in a few years. Yes, comin’ soon to GG. Paulina Meat Market makes their own beef jerky, and it’s just super yummy. This will be new cooking territory for me, but I will share my experience (and my recipe, if it’s good) in the near future. Stay tuned! Have you made your own jerky? Any suggestions on flavors are welcome!

Grocery Gal shops at Paulina Meat Market in Chicago's Lakeview neighborhood

Paulina Market’s beef jerky sliced to order – super tender and not tough


It’s been snowing a lot in Chicago lately. A little too much, if you’d ask me. Take 18 hours of snowfall and then throw in some below zero temperatures, then you’ve got Chicago 2014. While hundreds of people were stocking up at the major grocery stores the last two days, I’ve been staying in, keeping warm, and thinking about what to cook. My shelves are stocked with the stuff you need to make it through these types of days.

Grocery Gal came to fruition because I love food, entertaining and a good deal; but that really just boils down to loving to cook. Besides relaxing me, it’s a way I express gratitude to those I love. While I should be cleaning my office, folding laundry, or starting to prepare my taxes, I instead I look in the fridge to see what I can make for a nice Sunday brunch. Since there’s always eggs in the house (thank you Amish Farmers), I decided to take a twist on our normal Sunday egg taco breakfast and whip up a frittatta. I had some frozen spinach, feta cheese and orange peppers. Every good cook always has onions, garlic and potatoes on hand, so I sliced those up, sauteed with some organic Greek olive oil (thank you Fresh Farms) and assembled a little frittatta. Seven eggs and 25 minutes in the oven later, breakfast was ready to go for my family!

Grocery Gal Frittata

Grocery Gal Sunday Frittata: Feta cheese, spinach, orange pepper, onion and eggs with a sliced potato base

While that was baking, I started what I set out to cook that morning: Bean Soup with Smoked Meat. Perfect stick to your bones type of meal for a cold day like today. There should be a fancier name for this, but I don’t have one. It’s a staple at my house, and others, too. Why others? Because my husband is a vegetarian and I have no clue how to make a small pot of soup. That helped bring about Soup Fairy™. Instead of me eating the same soup over and over again, I share it with friends. They bring me back their empty jars, and I refill them. It’s win win. And it makes me the Soup Fairy™.

As a good first-generation European American, I reuse glass jars and cook with smoked meat. There are many different types out there (glass jars and smoked meat); my main protein in soups is smoked ribs. You can find smoked ribs at almost any good European deli, and a half a slab is a good amount for 1 pot of soup. My favorite smoked ribs comes from Bende, a Hungarian distributor out in Vernon Hills that has the best smoked meat selection in the midwest. Grocery Gal will be visiting Bende in the near future, but in the meantime, if you see Bende products at your local grocery, try the smoked ribs for soup, or the smoked tenderloin as a snack. Delis often have their own smoke ribs, like at  Montrose Deli and Amish Farmers, so find a slab and give this recipe a try.

Grocery Gal Bende Smoked Ribs

These are the types of gifts Grocery Gal gets from her dad. Bende smoked ribs!

My dad brought me a slab of ribs from Bende as my Christmas gift. Yes, we’re that serious about our smoked meats. It was time to break out my Christmas gift, and have me share it with you.

Bean Soup with Smoked Meat

  1. 1-2 lbs dried beans (I prefer navy beans or other small beans)
  2. 1-2 T olive oil
  3. 1 large onion, finely chopped
  4. 2-3 ribs celery, finely chopped
  5. 2-3 carrots, finely chopped
  6. 1 bay leaf
  7. 3 bullion cubes (I prefer Winiary Vegetable Buillion or 3 T Vegeta Natur)
  8. 1/2-1 slab smoked ribs, rinsed and cut into smaller pieces (2-3 ribs per piece)
  9. Fresh ground pepper

Prepare beans per bag instructions. Be sure to drain the soaking water and rinse off before adding to soup. That helps eliminate getting gas from the beans!

In a large stock pot, heat the olive oil, and saute the onion, celery and carrots until clear, about 5 minutes.

Grocery Gal Bean Soup with Smoked Meat

There’s no exact amount, but just put in a lot of onions, carrots and celery. Add some garlic, too.

Grocery Gal Bean Soup with Smoked Meat

Today’s soup has Navy and Pink beans

Grocery Gal Bean Soup with Smoked Meat

Vegeta Natur is great because it has no MSG. Use 2-3 tablespoons. Winiary has MSG, but it has a great celery root and cabbage flavor to it.

Add the beans and mix together. Add the bay leaf and bullion, stir it in to have it mix with the vegetables for a bit. Add enough water to the soup to that it covers the bean by an additional 1 inch or so. Add the ribs. Grind some pepper into the soup. You won’t need any salt, because the ribs that. Slowly cook the soup for 1-2 hours, until the beans are soft and the rib meat easily tears from the bone.

Grocery Gal Bean Soup with Smoked Meat

Rinse the slab off before slicing. Slice in to 2-3 rib chunks. Don’t forget to remove the string!

Grocery Gal Bean Soup with Smoked Meat

It might not look pretty now, but be patient

Remove the ribs from the soup and set aside to cool. Get a hand blender and zap the soup for 15-30 seconds. This will chop up the beans and vegetables, making the soup thicker. If you like thicker soups, blend it longer, if not, blend it less.

Grocery Gal Bean Soup with Smoked Meat

Use a hand blender to thicken the soup

Grocery Gal Bean Soup with Hand Pulled Smoked Meat

After the ribs have cooled, separate the meat by hand from the bones/fat and add to the soup.

Once the meat has cooled off, separate the meat from the bones and the fat. Do this by hand. There’s something about naturally torn meat that takes a million times better than sliced. I don’t know what it is, but trust me. Add it to the soup, remove the bay leaf, and enjoy. If it’s too much, pour into glass jars and freeze for yourself and your friends. Maybe you can be a Soup Fairy™, too

Stay warm!