Issacson & Stein. A Chicago institution that’s been around for over 80 years. Everyone knows the place, but have you ever been in there? When I worked downtown many moons ago, sales people would leave midday to pick up shrimp and oysters for their family dinners, while I was stuck at my desk creating their ads. Once, I got of work early and stopped in, but it was only a few minutes before they were closing. I could never make it in during the week, and by the weekend I had no desire to trek back downtown. Recently, I was in the neighborhood while Issacson & Stein was open (!) and made a point to stop in. Hopefully they had some Branzino fish so that I could try a new recipe from my Nom Nom Paleo cookbook. Issacson & Stein Fish Co Grocery GalThe store was much tinier than I remembered. I also didn’t recall it being self-serve before. When you come in, you can grab a basket, some plastic gloves and as many plastic bags as you need. They really give you the option to choose exactly which fish you want, with your gloved hands, instead of telling someone, “no, not that one, the one next to it.”

Issacson & Stein Fish Co Fish HeadsEverything was so fresh – the place had no fish odor to it. While they didn’t have the Branzino I was looking for, I knew I could substitute rainbow trout in the dish. They had Fresh Farms beaten by 15 cents on their oyster price: they were only 60 cents each, but I wasn’t in the mood for oysters that day.

Issacson & Stein Fish Co Grocery Gal OystersIssacson & Stein Fish Co Sepia Grocery GalOnce you’re done with your selection, you bring it to a counter where it’s weighed. From there, you get an adding machine receipt which you take up to the counter to pay. Fortunately, my rainbow trout was already cleaned, but if it wasn’t, I’d just have to bring it to the cleaning section after I paid. Issacson & Stein is definitely a self-service, no frills fish place with good prices. It’s also a Chicago institution.

Issacson & Stein Fish Co Grocery Gal

Grocery Gal Issacson & Stein Fish Co receiptOh, and if you were wondering, the trout came out delicious! I bought 2 fish for $12, stuffed them with parsley, thyme, oregano and lemon, and broiled in the oven. Yum!

Issacson & Stein Fish Co Grocery Gal

Issacson & Stein Fish Company. 800 West Fulton Market, Chicago, IL 60607. 312-421-2444. Monday 9am-4:15pm, Tuesday-Friday 8am-4:15pm, Saturday 8am-1pm, Closed Sunday.


In 2015, I’m making a conscious effort to stay away from processed foods. Once I started eating gluten-free in June, I began to feel better, but then found myself falling down the slippery slope of relying too often on gluten-free convenience foods. I normally wouldn’t eat boxed mac and cheese, but since it was gluten-free, I felt it was ok to eat an entire box for dinner. I realized this type of nonsense had to stop.

I came across a wonderful book called the Autoimmune Paleo cookbook by Mickey Trescott, and felt that it was time to eat with a whole foods approach. That philosophy isn’t anything new to me, it’s the way I grew up as a first generation American. Everything was always homemade; nothing ever came from a box. Granted, it’s hard cooking so much meat in a house with a vegetarian, but I’m fortunate my husband understands the importance of this. I’m not going to go into what the Paleo lifestyle is, but for those unfamiliar, Sarah Ballantyne sums it up nicely on her blog.

I was about to start an intensive two week reset and needed to buy grass fed beef and pastured pork and chicken. I also needed some less than glamorous pieces of meat, which included bones for making broth and beef liver. While I love and support Amish Farmers, it was the weekend, and I needed to find something in the city. I recalled seeing an Amish storefront next to the Empty Bottle on Western, so I hopped into my grocery getter and drove to Ukrainian Village.

Amish & Healthy FoodsThe store was bright and clean. I’ve since visited twice and there’s a mix of people in the store – the Ukrainian mother who thanked me in her native tongue when I opened the door so she could bring the baby stroller in, the twenty something hipster stocking up on vitamin supplements, and the older woman in yoga attire selecting fermented vegetables out of the cold case.

Amish & Healthy Foods Produce

Amish & Healthy Foods VitaminsI knew I was going to stop at Stanley’s to see what organic produce they had, so my focus at Amish & Healthy was meat. I couldn’t believe their offering, and I loved that the meats were frozen in convenient one pound packages. They carried both grass fed and traditional beef, all different types of organ meats (I know, it sounds gross, but it’s really good for you), bison, pork, turkey and chicken.  I chose some beef and chicken livers, soup bones and “small” beef bones to make my broth. I’m a sucker for turkey jerky, so I picked up a pound of ground turkey to make my own at home. After stopping at Amish & Healthy, I compared prices at both Whole Foods and Paulina Market. On all accounts, the prices at Amish & Healthy were cheaper, and I felt good about supporting not only a local business, but an Amish community in Indiana, all while eating cuts of meat that were better for me.

Amish & Healthy Foods ButcherThey have a small deli counter with foods that seem to rotate based on availability. I bought a bottle of their delicious ginger apple kombucha for $5.99 and their yummy paleo munchkies. It was at this time that I met the owner, Lucy. She explained how popular the kombucha was, and if I returned my bottle, next time I could get $1 off.

Amish & Healthy Foods PaleoWhile I didn’t need any at this time, Amish & Healthy sells a lot of dried fruit with no sugar added. And they’re not just your standard dried fruit fare: they sell sun-dried organic wild goji berries, freeze-dried cherries, juniper berries, and organic dried pomegranate seeds.  Amish & Healthy Foods Dried FruitThey do sell eggs for $5 a dozen. To me, that seems a little pricey, but I’m spoiled with Amish Farmers. Amish & Healthy also sell duck eggs with single or double yolks, for 50¢ and 75¢. The next time you plan to head out for some high quality meat, be sure to stop in at Amish & Healthy; you won’t be disappointed by the variety and the prices of their meat selection. And grab some paleo munchkins to go, too.

Amish & Healthy Foods StoreAmish Healthy Foods. 1025 North Western Avenue, Chicago, IL 60622, 773-278-1717. Open 7 days.


Over the past few years, local farmers markets have begun to gain momentum throughout Chicago. There are neighborhood and independent markets in many communities. Last Sunday I visited a new addition to Chicago’s Northwest Side – the Belmont-Cragin Farmer’s Market. I first found out about the market on Everyblock with it’s well-designed poster catching my eye.

Grocery Gal Belmont Cragin Market

A well designed flyer will always catch my eye

The market is ambitiously held every Sunday. It’s not far from the neighboring Portage Park farmers market which seems to interchange it’s weekends with the Jefferson Park Sunday Market. Do we really need another Farmer’s Market? With one like Belmont-Cragin, my vote is yes!

Belmont Cragin Farmer's Market Grocery Gal

Despite it being in a parking lot, it’s a great market

The market is located in the Belmont-Cragin Business District, directly on Belmont, east of Central Avenue (right by A&G Fresh Market) in a PNC parking lot. While it’s not the most glamorous location, it will hopefully gain many new customers from the Belmont traffic. It’s slightly west of the original Gene’s sausage shop.

What I liked about the market was it’s European Market flavor, featuring sustainable and artisan goods including jam, pastries, granola and cheeses, in addition to produce. As the growing season progresses, there will be more produce available, but on the second week there was still fresh asparagus, a variety of herbs and tons of gorgeous flowers for sale. Every vendor there had a purpose. There weren’t any corporate sponsors – like Directv or Xfinity – who were at the Portage Park Farmer’s Market that same Sunday.

Grocery Gal Belmont Cragin Farmer's Market

Herbs, vegetables and lots of beautiful flowers

I bought a delicious chocolate croissant from St. Roger Abby and the most incredible Pain de Sophia from Katic Breads. Where I’ve been reluctant in the past to buy a $6 loaf of bread from Eataly, I cannot wait until this Sunday to try another loaf of their amazing bread. The Pain de Sophia was recommended to me by Michael from Brightflower Farm, and he was spot on. The complex flavors of anise, cumin and fennel interspersed in organic wheat flour are addicting. I’ve had two slices of the bread for breakfast everyday this week with just a touch of butter. If you’re living gluten-free, there were tons of sweets from D-ology, too.

grocerygal-belmont-farmers-6I’m not traditionally a granola person, but Spice Roads Granola sucked me in with their sweet curry walnut granola. I eat it with plain yogurt and love it.

Grocery Gal Belmont Cragin Farmer's Market

Pain de Sophia and Spice Road Granola!

As a new market, Belmont-Cragin will need a steady stream of customers to stay successful; it doesn’t have the deep pockets that other markets have for advertising. However, they keep it real and aren’t bringing in the corporate sponsors the same said markets are. This is a Farmer’s Market – I’m not looking to choose a satellite provider! Keeping their focus on local, sustainable and artisan goods supports local  businesses along with giving residents something special in their own back yard. And, many of the vendors have great samples, too! Even if you’re not near the Belmont-Cragin neighborhood, take the time to visit them some Sunday. There’s something special happening here, and Grocery Gal wishes them a lot of success!

Grocery Gal Belmont Cragin Farmer's Market

The hand painted sign gives it a definite European feel

Belmont-Cragin Farmer’s Market. 5446 West Belmont Ave…rain or shine. Every Sunday 10am-2pm until October 26th.